The Last Emperor (1987) - News Poster

News

Joan Chen Talks Diversity in Hollywood, Welcomes #MeToo

  • Variety
Joan Chen Talks Diversity in Hollywood, Welcomes #MeToo
Chinese-American actress, writer and director Joan Chen says that she was flattered when Time magazine described her as the “Elizabeth Taylor of China.”

When asked at an in-conversation event in Singapore on Saturday whether she paved the way for Chinese actresses to follow in Hollywood, Chen said, “We never go to work because we want to pave the way for other actors. We go to work because we are compelled to, we must, we love it and it feeds us.”

Chen was a juror at the 2nd International Film Festival & Awards Macao, in 2017. “Sometimes the reality is, you open the way for others, but obviously that wasn’t my motivation,” Chen said. When Chen began her Hollywood career, she did not see any role models, she said. “You turn on the television and basically, you don’t see yourself,” Chen said.

Chen did auditions for Michael Cimino’s 1985 film “Year of the Dragon,
See full article at Variety »

Directors Choice: Erik Matti on ‘Once Upon A Time In America’

  • Variety
At the Macao festival’s popular Director’s Choice strand, contemporary filmmakers are asked to choose one genre film that has had an impact on them. Three Asian filmmakers were asked to choose non-Asian films, while non-Asian filmmakers were asked to select Asian films. The Philippines’ Erik Matti chose Sergio Leone’s “Once Upon A Time In America.” He explains his reasons.

“I was choosing between ‘Once Upon A Time In America’ and ‘The Last Emperor’ as the films to show. These are epic films and the kind of films that is hard to come by nowadays unless there’s a superhero character in it or with spaceships. And to think, both films were made where the filmmaking was all in-camera.”

“I eventually decided on “Once Upon A Time In America” because of the contemporary narrative structure that it employed, whereas ‘The Last Emperor’ was very much classical and formalistic in its linear dramatic structure.
See full article at Variety »

Unfinished Bernardo Bertolucci Film ‘The Echo Chamber’ Coming to Screens

Unfinished Bernardo Bertolucci Film ‘The Echo Chamber’ Coming to Screens
Bernardo Bertolucci’s “The Echo Chamber,” the final project the acclaimed director was worked on prior to his death last month, will be coming to the big screen.

Indigo Film, an Italian production company behind several Paolo Sorrentino films including “The Great Beauty” and “Youth,” is working to finish the film as a tribute to Bertolucci, one of Indigo Film’s founding partners Nicola Giuliano told TheWrap.

“The Echo Chamber” would’ve been Bertolucci’s first film as a director since 2012’s “Me and You.” No director has yet been selected to direct the picture in his stead. Bertolucci was wheelchair bound for much of the end of his life and died on Nov. 26 at age 77 after a short fight with cancer.

Also Read: Martin Scorsese Says Bernardo Bertolucci 'Inspired' and 'Opened Many Doors' for Him

Bertolucci wrote the first draft of the screenplay along with Ludovica Rampoldi, a writer for the Italian series “Gomorrah,
See full article at The Wrap »

Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Project, ‘The Echo Chamber,’ to Be Brought to Big Screen

  • Variety
Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Project, ‘The Echo Chamber,’ to Be Brought to Big Screen
“The Echo Chamber,” the unfinished project that Italian great Bernardo Bertolucci was working on before his unexpected death last month, is to be brought to the big screen by Italy’s Indigo Film.

Nicola Giuliano, a founding partner of Indigo (“The Great Beauty”), confirmed that the chamber piece would be produced as a tribute to Bertolucci’s artistic vitality. The project would have marked Bertolucci’s first time back in the director’s chair since his 2012 coming-of-age drama, “Me and You.” Giuliano said that a new helmer for the film had not yet been chosen.

Bertolucci, who died on Nov. 26 in Rome after a short bout with cancer, had completed a first draft of the screenplay, which he co-wrote with two young Italian writers: Ludovica Rampoldi, whose credits include hit series “Gomorrah,” and Ilaria Bernardini, a novelist who has worked on the Italian adaptation of “In Treatment.”

Very little is
See full article at Variety »

Remembering Stan Lee, William Goldman, Nicolas Roeg and More Reel-Important People We Lost in November

Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Bernardo Bertolucci (1941-2018) - Filmmaker. He won two Oscars for writing and directing The Last Emperor, which also won Best Picture. He was also nominated for helming The Conformist and Last Tango in Paris. His other movies include The Dreamers, Stealing Beauty, 1900, Little Buddha, The Sheltering Sky and Before the Revolution. Early in his career, he served as assistant director for Pasolini's Accattone! He died on November 26. [THR] Dominique Blanchar (1927-2018) - Actress. She co-starred in...
See full article at Movies.com »

'Last Emperor' Producer on Bernardo Bertolucci: He Drank From "the Milk of Hollywood"

'Last Emperor' Producer on Bernardo Bertolucci: He Drank From
He was my best friend.

It started with The Last Emperor in 1984, and the last film we made together was The Dreamers in 2003. But we continued to be very close. I was there with him [in Rome] at the end. I left Sunday night, and he died Monday morning. But I got to say goodbye.

We enjoyed making films together enormously. It was very Italian, something between an opera and a fiesta. He was the last of the living-legend Italian filmmakers.

He leaves a very big footprint. But he had a great personality, and the personality of the ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Peter Travers on Bernardo Bertolucci: A Provocateur Whose Films Inspire Awe

Peter Travers on Bernardo Bertolucci: A Provocateur Whose Films Inspire Awe
The first time I met the rabblerousing Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci, he was searching for a word, rubbing two fingers together as if to spark a thought. “I think — how do I put it? — that the word is texture. You know, how a movie feels when you hold it in your head and run it through all your own life experience. So there’s depth to it. And politics. And sex. And, if you’re lucky, maybe magic.”

Bertolucci, who died on Monday at 77, spent his last few years with
See full article at Rolling Stone »

How Bernardo Bertolucci’s X-Rated ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Became a Blockbuster

  • Indiewire
How Bernardo Bertolucci’s X-Rated ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Became a Blockbuster
Bernardo Bertolucci leaves a cinematic legacy of great films, including “The Conformist” and “The Last Emperor,” which won nine Oscars including Best Picture and Director. However, his biggest hit would be inconceivable today. “Last Tango in Paris,” the X-rated drama starring Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider, made more in its 1973 domestic release than the year’s James Bond entry, “Live and Let Die.” It was the year’s number 7 film, with an adjusted gross of $186 million — just a little below what Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” has amassed so far.

The mid-’70s were a high point for sophisticated, critic-influenced foreign films. Veteran directors like Bergman and Fellini remained significant players, while Francois Truffaut, Alain Resnais, and Claude Chabrol regularly found success. However, “Last Tango” was a sensation; even today, among foreign films it’s outstripped only by “La Dolce Vita” ($245 million) and “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” ($207 million
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Scorsese Says Bernardo Bertolucci ‘Inspired’ and ‘Opened Many Doors’ for Him

  • The Wrap
Martin Scorsese Says Bernardo Bertolucci ‘Inspired’ and ‘Opened Many Doors’ for Him
Martin Scorsese says that Bernardo Bertolucci, the Italian director who passed away Monday, both “inspired” and “opened many doors” for him as a director.

In the wake of Bertolucci’s death, Scorsese said in a statement that he first saw Bertolucci’s 1964 film “Before the Revolution” in Italy and came out of the theater “in a daze, speechless.”

“I was truly stunned and moved by the level of sheer artistry and talent up there on the screen, I was shocked by the freedom of the picture, I was somewhat mystified by so many of the cultural references and cross-references, and, as someone who wanted to make films, I was inspired,” Scorsese said.

Also Read: Hollywood Remembers Bernardo Bertolucci as a 'Giant of Italian Filmmaking'

He also applauded Bertolucci’s “The Conformist,” “Last Tango in Paris,” “The Last Emperor” and “The Sheltering Sky” as films that had a profound influence on
See full article at The Wrap »

Martin Scorsese pays tribute to 'magical' Bernardo Bertolucci

Martin Scorsese pays tribute to 'magical' Bernardo Bertolucci
’When I think of Bertolucci – the man, the artist – the word that comes to mind is refinement.’

Martin Scorsese has paid tribute to Bernardo Bertolucci, who died earlier on Monday (26) aged 77.

Bertolucci’s publicist said on Monday that the great director behind such films as Last Tango In Paris and The Last Emperor died of cancer.

“In 1964, I went up to Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center for the 2nd New York Film Festival to see a new film from Italy. It was called Before the Revolution and it was by a young director named Bernardo Bertolucci,” said Scorsese. ”I
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘The Favourite’ reviews: The ‘bawdy,’ ‘bacchanalian,’ ‘deliciously nasty’ film could stage a royal Oscar coup

  • Gold Derby
‘The Favourite’ reviews: The ‘bawdy,’ ‘bacchanalian,’ ‘deliciously nasty’ film could stage a royal Oscar coup
Royal movies have periodically been Oscar favorites over the years, from “Hamlet” (1948) to “A Man for All Seasons” (1966), “Amadeus” (1984), “The Last Emperor” (1987), “Shakespeare in Love” (1998) and “The King’s Speech” (2010). Now Greek filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos has made a costume drama for the 21st century: “The Favourite,” which takes a jaundiced look at the court of Queen Anne in the early 18th century. It opened on November 23. Will it be the latest to stage a royal Oscar coup?

As of this writing it has a MetaCritic score of 91 based on 28 reviews, which makes it one of the top 10 highest scoring films of 2018 so far. And on Rotten Tomatoes it has been rated 95% fresh based on 84 reviews. It’s being called “extravagantly wonderful,” “bawdy” and “bacchanalian.” But while it’s “filthy-minded” and “deliciously nasty” with “venomous insults” and “backstabbing,” it’s also “a little heartbreaking.” And it boasts “perfectly pitched” performances by its actors Rachel Weisz,
See full article at Gold Derby »

From ‘Last Tango’ to ‘Last Emperor,’ Bertolucci Was the First and Last of His Kind

  • Variety
From ‘Last Tango’ to ‘Last Emperor,’ Bertolucci Was the First and Last of His Kind
The year 2018 is shaping up to be a tragedy of epic proportions for lovers of world cinema. In April, Czech director Milos Forman passed away, and now, in late November, within a matter of days, we have lost avant garde maestro Nicolas Roeg and that great Italian iconoclast Bernardo Bertolucci.

Consider: Forman’s “Amadeus,” Roeg’s identity-shattering “Performance” (co-directed with Donald Cammell), and Bertolucci’s still unsurpassed exploration of moral ambiguity and personal compromise, “The Conformist.” The medium is inconceivable in its present form without these films, whose directors were hardly one-hit wonders, contributing masterpiece after masterpiece during the most fertile stretches of their careers. Though each had struggled to maintain his relevance in recent decades, any late-life disappointment seems inevitable when judged relative to the achievements that came before.

Of the three, Bertolucci was by far the most successful at sustaining his impact until the end, for his brand was controversy,
See full article at Variety »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘The Last Emperor’ and ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ Dead at 77

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘The Last Emperor’ and ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ Dead at 77
Oscar-winning director Bernardo Bertolucci, best known for his nine-time Oscar-winning masterpiece The Last Emperor, has died at 77. The Italian auteur behind groundbreaking works like Last Tango in Paris and The Conformist passed away in Rome this weekend following a battle with cancer, according to his publicist (via Deadline). He is survived by his wife, British filmmaker Clare Peploe, […]

The post Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘The Last Emperor’ and ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ Dead at 77 appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Remembering Bertolucci by Anne-Katrin Titze

Bernardo Bertolucci's The Last Emperor was chosen by Wong Kar Wai as artistic director of The Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute exhibition China: Through the Looking Glass, curated by Andrew Bolton Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Bernardo Bertolucci died in Rome today, November 26, at the age of 77. When I contacted filmmakers Saverio Costanzo and Atom Egoyan, producer Don Rosenfeld, Richard Peña, Director Emeritus of the New York Film Festival, and Tribeca Film Festival Artistic Director Frédéric Boyer, for a remembrance of Bernardo Bertolucci, they sent the following personal tributes.

Atom sent his from Canada where he is filming Guest Of Honour.

Atom Egoyan on Bernardo Bertolucci: "I'll never forget Bertolucci introducing Michelangelo Antonioni at a special outdoor screening of L'Avventura at the Taormina Film Festival in 1994." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

"Shooting today and busy, but I'll never forget Bertolucci introducing Michelangelo Antonioni at a special outdoor screening of L'Avventura at the
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Critic's Notebook: Bernardo Bertolucci Indelibly But Disturbingly Pushed the Envelope of Onscreen Sex

Critic's Notebook: Bernardo Bertolucci Indelibly But Disturbingly Pushed the Envelope of Onscreen Sex
The death of Bernardo Bertolucci at 77 will come as a blow to anyone who grew up on Italian art house movies in their heyday. An intellectual and a sensualist capable of combining poetry and social issues in his films, the filmmaker was an ever-inventive auteur backed by the finest technicians of his day. His eclectic talent moved nervously between Europe and Hollywood, China and the world, as his themes touched the topics that most piqued his curiosity, from politics and society to psychoanalysis and eroticism.

One of the best-known Italian directors for his multiple-Oscar-winning historical epic The Last Emperor (1987),...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Last Tango in Paris Director, Dies at 77

Bernardo Bertolucci, Last Tango in Paris Director, Dies at 77
Bernardo Bertolucci, the influential Italian director of Last Tango in Paris and The Last Emperor, has passed away at the age of 77. The news of Bertolucci's death was confirmed by his publicist. The filmmaker passed away in Rome following a battle with cancer.

During his five-decade career, working both in Europe and in Hollywood, Bernardo Bertolucci had a major influence on the movie world. The filmmaker got his start in the 1960s in Italian cinema with works such as La Commare Secca (The Grim Reaper), which served as his feature directorial debut. He would later go on to helm the political feature Before the Revolution (1964), before directing one of his most acclaimed works with 1970's The Conformist.

Born to a wealthy family in 1941, Bernardo Bertolucci was the son of Attilio Bertolucci, a well-regarded poet. After winning an award for poetry at the age of 21 himself, the younger Bertolucci decided that
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-winning Director, Dead At Age 77

  • CinemaRetro
Bertolucci on location for "Last Tango in Paris" with Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider in 1972.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Bernardo Bertolucci, the acclaimed Italian director, has died in Rome at age 77. The cause of death was not immediately revealed. Bertolucci won an Oscar for his direction of the 1987 film "The Last Emperor" and also received acclaim for his earlier films that included "The Spider's Stratagem" and "The Conformist". A left-wing Marxist through much of his life, Bertolucci also directed the 1976 epic "1900" which was steeped in political overtones. His most famous and notorious film was "Last Tango in Paris" (1972), which was non-political but highly controversial. It's graphic sexual content was the cause of international controversy and resulted in Bertolucci being charged with obscenity in his native Italy. The film starred Marlon Brando in the tale of a depressed, middle-aged American ex-pat who indulges in a series of anonymous sexual encounters with a teenage Parisian girl (Maria Schneider.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Hollywood Remembers Bernardo Bertolucci as a ‘Giant of Italian Filmmaking’

  • The Wrap
Hollywood Remembers Bernardo Bertolucci as a ‘Giant of Italian Filmmaking’
Hollywood is paying their respects to Bernardo Bertolucci, the famed Italian art-house director who died Monday at age of 77 after battling cancer.

Filmmakers and critics celebrated his life’s work, which included films “Last Tango in Paris,” “The Last Emperor” and “The Conformist,” in tributes on Monday morning.

“Farewell to Bernardo Bertolucci, Honorary Palme at #Cannes2011 for his entire career after chairing the Jury in 1990,” the official account of the Cannes Film Festival tweeted. “A giant of Italian filmmaking, he will remain forever a leading light in world cinema.”

Also Read: Bernardo Bertolucci, 'Last Tango in Paris' Director, Dies at 77

Director Guillermo Del Toro took the time to rank his top three Bertolucci films, starting with “The Conformist,” followed by “1900” and “The Last Emperor.”

Bertolucci won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for “The Last Emperor” and was also nominated in that category for “Last Tango in Paris.
See full article at The Wrap »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Last Tango in Paris Director, Dies at 77

Bernardo Bertolucci, Last Tango in Paris Director, Dies at 77
Italian film director Bernardo Bertolucci, whose career defined scandal and evoked eroticism and sumptuous beauty, has died of cancer in Rome. The director of Last Tango In Paris was 77 and had been confined to a wheelchair for much of the last 10 years.

A product of Italian New Wave cinema’s golden era, the Parma-born Bertolucci achieved international acclaim, winning the Oscar for Best Director for 1987’s The Last Emperor.

Beginning as a poet, Bertolucci entered film work as a writer for Pier Paolo Pasolini before attracting attention as a director-writer with 1970’s The Conformist, a stylish work that brought him
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘Last Tango In Paris’ Filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci Passes Away At Age 77

Academy Award-winning Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci has sadly passed away at the age of 77 over the weekend. According to THR, a spokesperson for the director said he died of cancer.

Bertolucci was an acclaimed director, with over two dozen films completed in his five-decade-long career. He’s probably best known for his Oscar-winning film “The Last Emperor” and his Marlon Brando film “Last Tango in Paris,” and his lifelong partnership with celebrated cinematographer Vittorio Storraro; they made 9 films together.

Continue reading ‘Last Tango In Paris’ Filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci Passes Away At Age 77 at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed

 
Men's Rogaine 5% Minoxidil Hair Regrowth Treatment Foam - 3 Months Supply - NEW! | Asbak Band Ternyata Salah Mengenalmu | braquo french